Choking: the story behind it.

Choking

Choking on these words
You can leave now
Oh haven’t you heard
You can leave now

We stand there like statues from different cities
Both warriors of the same war
Both victors of our territories
Why do I feel so small?
Oh you’ve got it all figured out
What will be will be

Fine work from a sailor’s hand
Who’s always running away
In between all your complex ideas
Found out how love should be
When you get the time to feel anything
Anything real for me
Oh you’ve got it all figured out
What will be will be

Fine words from a sailor’s son
Who’s always running away
I don’t want your sympathy
Don’t quote me another phrase
I understand all your philosophies
But it hurts me just the same

Choking on these words
You can leave now
Oh haven’t you heard
You can leave now

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Babylon: the story behind it.

Babylon

Babylon

I’d like to think that I’m not one of those artists  that need to be trascendental or metaphysical in order to engage their audience to admire their paintings. Actually, I don’t even like calling myself an “artist” since I only paint. I wouldn’t dare be that pretentious. But obviously, what I paint doesn’t come out of nowhere; it has a story behind it and a feeling that I wanted to share, exploit or investigate.

In Babylon, I wanted to experience the love that I was lacking, the care that I was craving and the memories that I was missing. Love in its possesive and initial state. Love put in that high pedestal that we build thinking it won’t be taken away from us. That naive love that believes in forevers and immutability. The inmature love, the one that doesn’t need fighting for, the one we all dream of easily and effortlessly preserving. The surreal kind of love.

The name of the painting came from one of my favourite bands that I’m currently obsessed with: Angus and Julia Stone. At the end of this post you can listen to it! Enjoy!

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Me gustaría pensar que no soy una de esos artistas que tienen la necesidad de ser trascendentales y metafísicos cuando explican la inspiración de sus cuadros o de sus obras de arte. De hecho, no me gusta llamarme a mí misma “artista”, me parece demasiado pretencioso para alguien a quien simplemente le gusta pintar en sus ratos libres. No me llamo a mí misma tampoco escritora, y aquí estoy escribiendo. Pero obviamente existe una historia detrás de cada cuadro, un sentimiento que quería plasmar en el lienzo, compartir, investigar y explotar.

En Babylon, quería poner de relieve el amor que sentía haber perdido y que ansiaba. Ese  amor en su estado inicial, un amor posesivo e idílico. El amor que muchas veces ponemos en un pedestal esperando que nunca nadie nos arrebate. El amor inocente e ingenuo que cree en “parasiempres” y en la inmutabilidad de los sentimientos. El amor inmaduro, ése por el que no se necesita luchar, el que todos soñamos llegar a conservar sin esfuerzo alguno, fácilmente. En definitiva, un amor utópico e irreal, pasajero.

El nombre del cuadro viene de la canción (con el mismo nombre) de uno de los grupos de música que me tiene obsesionada últimamente: Angus and Julia Stone. 

Aquí tenéis la canción.